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J.Pack is conscientious over the environment, and where possible uses 100% recycled plastics and all plastics used are degradable, we feel that by offering these ideas to our end customer, they may better use our scarce resources.. The following are ideas submitted to J.Pack, we cannot validate the authonticity of these ideas. if you feel you have an idea to contribute, please email us at : josef@jpackproducts.com.au
Please pay attention as all our products are not toys and should not be used as such.

  • Keep a few extra in the bottom of the trashcan, so there is always another one to put in and you always know when you are running low.
  • I have found that I can use the smaller bags roughly in the 27 litre range as disposable gloves for tasks that don't need fine finger use, carefull not to get cut.
  • Cover a paint brush when you go for a break. Make sure the bag is closed tightly.
  • Carry one or more with you when you go walking to pick up aluminum cans, trash or treasure.
  • Keep a few bags in your car to tie around your knees in case you have to change a flat tire in your good clothes.
  • If you don't lay them out flat, but wrinkle them up, they are good packing material when moving, sending packages, or storing Christmas stuff.
  • Carry a few in the diaper bag to hold soiled clothes and wet/dirty diapers.
  • Put extra dirty rags in a bag and tie a knot and dump in laundry bag without fear of making everything else smelly or dirty.
  • Put delicate (or easily dirtied) clothes you will clean later or bring to the drycleaner in a bag and tie a knot and dump in laundry bag without fear of having them get dirtier or smellier than they already are.
  • Use dark garbage bag to cover more expensive stuff sitting on back seat or behind front seats in your car, note they do get hot on sunny days.
  • Use them when walking your dog to clean up deposits. With your hand inside the bag, pick up the pile, then turn the bag inside out while still on your hand, tie and drop in the trash.
  • Sponge paint with them instead of buying an expensive sea sponge. Crumple, dip in roller pan, dab on paper, and apply randomly to the wall.
  • My son wears cloth diapers at home, but has to use disposables at daycare. Sometimes after they get home, he has a big mess in his disposable. To keep odors down, I wraps the diaper in the 36 litre bag. These go into the trash can.
  • Plastic bags make a good filler for craft projects that require stuffing as long as the item is not going to be used as a toy or cushion. Left over yarn pieces and strips of plastic bags do a great job in such decorative items as Christmas ornaments that require some type of stuffing to give them shape.
  • This reader's niece made a lovely holiday wreath from plastic bags....she got a wire rim from a craft store and tied each bag around the rim and then 'fluffed' them after she squeezed as many as she could onto the wire rim......then added one large red ribbon and several bunches of holly berries.
  • I use the smaller and medium size bags, I believe they are 36 litres to put raw meat or poultry in the refrigerator so they can't leak onto the shelves and cause bacteria problems, for sanitary reasons the food must be packet in original supermarket casing.
  • A journalist uses plastic bags as file keeper and clipping organizer. When he clips his newspapers for stories and ideas, he encases these newsclips in the plastic sleeves, cut nicely to fit a 3-ring binder, closing with a wee bit of masking tape.
  • John, my son cleans the litter box a little faster and easier, by putting the mess in the bag and taking it straight outside.
  • my grandmother uses plastic bags to store sweaters, sweatshirts and other bulky things in her closet. She places the bags into large boxes in order to stack them. I do the same thing, but only to store out-of-season clothing. (Great under the bed, in the attic, etc.-- keeps the clothes or what-not clean and bug-free.)
  • Put several on your hand to serve as protection from poison ivy. Just pull up the plant with the bagged hand, carefully turn bag inside out and dispose of properly. No ivy touches your hand and no poisons are used.
  • This reader says: I got tired of finding all kinds of little toys laying around my 4 year olds room and my house so I bought a big storage box and divided her toys into bags: McDonald toys in one, plastic food in another, plastic dishes in another, toy animals in another, etc. and put them into the plastic storage box. Now she is allowed to have 2 bags of toys out at one time and has to put the toys back in the bags and into the storage box before she can get any more toys out. It has cut down on pick up time and stepping on toys all the time.
  • I use 140 litre bags with a vacuum cleaner to make my own "shrink and store" bags instead of paying major bucks for the kind with the valve built in. Just fold your blankets, sweaters, whatever neatly and set them in a plastic bag. Twist it around the hose of your vacuum cleaner and suck the air out! To seal, just slide the twisted bag off the hose while twisting it tighter, then fold it over and tape it down.
  • I use them with either short stakes or a round of low fencing to protect my early transplants. First I put them over the plants to protect from sun, wind, and at night cold, just with a couple of slits in the top ( the top contracts with the cold and expands with heat to ventilate the young plant.) Then as the plant starts to grow I cut the top of the bag off, by now there should be no frost, but the plastic still acts as a wind break) later I may just pull it down the stakes, or take it off completely.
  • I also grab one when I step into the garden; much easier to stuff a few bags in your pocket and pull one out to fill with beets, another with carrots, or some lettuce, oh, and lovely onions. Friends have a non-returnable container in which to take their fresh produce home!
  • Still another use is to cut a bag (good for the ones already tearing) into strips to hold vines and canes and other plants in place, just don't tie them too tightly.
  • When I have to work in a wet garden or other muddy site, I tie plastic bags on the OUTSIDE of my shoes. The mud cannot clump onto the loose plastic like it does to shoes or boots. What a cleanup saver!!
  • Take a walk with one, it's amazing what you can find. I found fresh rosemary clippings, pecans and walnuts in the street close to where I live. What a bargain price, they were all free !
  • Cut the bags down the side seams so they lie flat, and use several prepared in this manner as a drip sheet when painting models, fingernails, or doing other messy things.
  • Inevitably when children go on camps, water activites are part of the fun. Here is an old hiker's secret. Prevent saturated backpack contents by placing everything inside a garbage-size bag, tying with a twist-tie and THEN placing it inside the pack. Even if the pack falls in a lake, your clothes should stay reasonably dry!
  • Thicker, vinyl-ish plastic bags make great packs for long-time storage of old notebooks, magazines, artwork, deeds etc. They are "acid free" and keep out paper-eating insects such as silverfish. Colorcode them and/or label them with an oil-based marker, then stick in the desired stack of paper, fold the top over twice, and seal right across with heavy stickytape.
  • Big 240 litre black garbage bags make excellent disposable raincoats for camping when you sut arm holes and a head hole in the sides and bottom. Compact, light to carry in your pack and useful!
  • You can also cut thicker bags to be flat, and use them to cover books or recipe cards so that they are wipe-down when you are cooking(use a clear bag for a recipe card).
  • If you have a dough such as playdough that you are working food colouring though, food colour stains laminated or plastic benchtops so put the dough inside the bag, add a few drops of colour, tie the bag and knead away. Throw away the bag when finished, or use it to store playdough and keep it moist. Easy!
  • The worst to happen is you're dressed-up in your Sunday best, and the car needs gas. I keep a few (plastic bags) around to use as a disposable glove, then toss it. Now I don't go to church smelling like a gas pump.
  • To make sewing patterns last longer, I take my tissue pattern pieces, use spray on glue, and then lay them out onto plastic bags. You can color code the patterns by using different color bags for each pattern. They will last forever.
  • I buy the plastic bags and stick them in my purse. Then on a rainy day when I have shopping to do, I slip the wet umbrella into the bag, and can actually carry it around under my arm, or even slip it into my purse while shopping. It keeps me dry, and the merchandise dry, so that others can buy good quality products, rather than wet and damaged ones.
  • One suggestion that I do have for re-cycling plastic bags is to also donate them to your local hospital and clinics. One thing they do is send you home with containers for different tests, and it is far less embarassing to carry them home in a bag. Just drop them off at the information desk at a hospital or at the front desk of a clinic. They will get someone to take them to the proper areas for you.
  • I keep a plastic bag hanging on the door handle of my laundry room. After rinsing, I toss my recyclable glass and plastic into the bag. When it gets full I grab it and take to the collection bin outside. No dirty collection bin in the house and no fumbling to carry a lot of loose items out to the bin.
  • I always put shoes into a plastic bag before packing them in a suitcase. Not only to keep the clothes clean but for any possible odor problem.
  • I often keep fabric I've purchased in plastic bags with the pattern, thread, buttons, or any notions I plan to use.
  • My son delivered newspapers, and had to pay for the plastic bags he put them in. One woman on his route saved them and when he went to collect each month, she gave them to him to reuse.
  • I am currently using the plastic bags for packing fragile items for moving. They work as good as any other plastic packing material. I wrap each fragile item in several bags and then stuff bags all around items in a box. I have shipped things cross country using bags for packing with no problem.
  • Another colligue added: When we moved, we did our own packing. We wrapped all our dishes, knick nacks and breakable things in plastic bags. Nothing broke and we didn't have to wash off the newsprint from newspapers.
  • When traveling, I always tuck a couple of plastic bags in our suitcases to put our dirty clothes in, at the end of a day. Keeps your clean clothes smelling a lot fresher!
  • When traveling, I wrap an extra pair of shoes for each person in my family in a plastic bag. These can be tucked into travel bags and the clothes stay clean.
  • Another colligue added: I also use plastic grocery bags when traveling. Not only for shoes, but for shampoo, lotion. liquid shower gel, etc. If any of the bottles/tubes leak, you just throw the bag away and your clothes and luggage are not damaged.
  • A few years ago I had surgery on one of my feet and could not walk or stand for several months. The minute I got a walking cast on the first thing I wanted to do was have a shower (I did wash during those two months, hahaha) My husband took several grocery bags and put them around my cast and taped them on top to make a covering for the cast and bingo I jumped in the shower, just be sure to watch your step because they can be a little slippery in the shower.
  • I also use them to line plastic margarine containers for mixing powdered paint. When the painting time is over, I simply put a twist tie on the top of the bag, snap on the lid and the paint stays good for our next art lesson.
  • I use large dark plastic bags to cover off season clothes hanging in the closet. Put a hole in the bottom for a coat hangar to go through. Also great to use if you don't own a travel bag to carry clothes in.
  • I hang Christmas decorations - wreaths and long bows on a hangar and put a plastic bag over it in the closet.
  • My husband works in an environment that has a lot of graphite. He puts his lunch for the day in a bag. It comes home with his reusable containers and is disposed of. No lunch boxes or bags to clean from that difficult to clean graphite.
  • Use a large plastic bag to fit over ceiling fan blades for cleaning. Simply dust the blades and let the mess fall into the bag.
  • Cut several bags into thin strips. Once cut, gather strips in your hand and tape to the end of a ruler, dowel, or paper towel tube. Make sure you have enough strips to go around the end of the tube. Oila! Instant cheerleader pompom!! In the absence of a tube, I've also twisted a couple bags tightly into a loop and used that for a handle. My 4-year-old daughter loves these!
  • Cut brightly colored bags into strips and tie to the electric fence at space intervals. The horses, cattle and even deer can see the plastic fluttering in the breeze and are not so apt to run into the fence and tear it down.
  • Keep one in the car at all times, especially when you have kids in with you. They make handy travel - sick bags!
  • I use the garden bags to store my compost (my compost can is small and needs to be emptied frequently) until I can take it out.
  • I stuff my shoes to keep them from creasing or looking poorly. I just stuff as many plastic bags into the shoe to keep them looking new.
  • I sell books on eBay and Half.com and use plastic grocery bags to wrap the books before wrapping them in newspaper (for padding) and then plain brown grocery bags. The plastic bag protects the books from newsprint, several thicknesses of newspaper protect the books from damage enroute and cuts way down on packaging costs. My only expense is wide cellophane tape which I use to reinforce all corners and to cover the mailing and return address (in case they get wet). Saves me about 50 cents to one dollar per package.
  • I also keep a bag in my closet filled with my belts that don't have a buckle on them that normally can be hung on a clothes hanger.
  • I use bags in the garden to keep out the weeds. Instead of expensive landscape fabric or weed kill, bags are easier to handle around small plants and for use here and there whereever the weeds pop up. Cover lightly out of site and after the weeds are gone, uncover the bag and reuse it again and again.
  • The black big ones are very good to protect from rain and to keep warm the seeds of bedding plants. Black attract the light and provide warm.
  • I keep plastic bags in the car, because I need them when I go shopping to a supermarket were you have to pay the plastic bags. Normally at supermakets plastic bags are free of charge and you can get so many that it is a real shame.
  • I have 2 main recipe books, one for main dishes, salads etc. and the other for desserts and candy, in those stand-up secretarial books. I use two flat plastic bags just slightly larger than the pages, one on the front and one on the back which I slip on after I've found the recipe I want. No more food stains all over my cookbooks.
  • I keep a few plastic bags in my car. If I happen to park at a meter that is broken, I cover the meter with a plastic bag. I write "broken" on the bag in marker, tie the handles together around the pole part of the meter, and go on my way. I have never received a parking ticket when I've done this. The bag is a clear signal that the meter is broken.
  • Stuff cushions for outdoor use (furniture, etcetera) with plastic bags. Works especially well if the fabric for the cushions is waterproof as well.
  • Keep some in the car and use as litter bags. Stuff a bag full into the pocket behind seats or anywhere else, take one out and hang it somewhere convenient.
  • I used two inside out plastic bags to empty a mouse trap. Properly done, with one hand inside each bag, it's possible to empty the trap and end up with one bag and the mouse securely tied up inside the second bag. You even have handles to carry the entire unpleasant affair to the garbage can. If you are squeamish about all this, you can even include the disposable trap inside the bag.
  • Have you ever struggled to stuff a large pillow (such as a couch cushion) into a very tight fitting cover? Remember how hard it was to stuff it in and then it was almost impossible to zip up the cover because you didn't have the pillow all the way to the back? A large plastic bag to the rescue! I put the pillow into a large garbage bag and gathered the opening around a vacuum cleaner hose. As the air is sucked out, a pillow the size of a library will shrink to the size of a single book! Place the shriveled pillow inside the cover and allow the air back in. The pillow will regain its original size and shape and be inside the cover. The plastic bag can be removed by reaching inside and pulling it out, in bits and pieces if necessary.
  • Cut a plastic grocery bag down both sides and use it to line your metal paint tray (secure with tape) when doing any house painting. This will save time during clean up as well as money and plastic since you won't need to buy the pre-made liners.
  • I place a recycled (thank-YOU from J.Pack for respecting the environment) plastic bag over my paint tray, fill with paint, then when the job is done -just remove the bag and the tray is clean and ready to go again.
  • Plastic bags are great for those painters who run out of paint pallets. Stretch out the bag to creat an even covering and lay out paints on it. The bags will work great with acrylics, watercolor, guache, tempra and all paint that are alike.
  • I buy very large trash bags from Bunnings, the ones that fit large city council bins, not the small ones, while holding them against the window, staple the 2 top corners at the top of the window seal. Let hang, if the entire window is not covered, add another one from the bottom up and use packing tape straight across to hold them together. This will make it dark in the home and cut cooling bills in the summer drastically. In the winter it stops the shine of Christmas lights from lighting up the rooms, and the best thing too, it looks like tint from outside, no-one knows the truth. You can still lift the plastic to look outside or roll it up to let the light in in the winter during the day. It's cheap and does a great job.
  • My solution to overstuffed dresser drawers was two plastic bags for socks, one for mine and one for my husband.
  • On a cross country trip with children, one of my sons, (4yrs. old) had diahrrea, and there were no rest rooms. We were out in the middle of no where. All I had was a plastic 52 litre bag, and a roll of paper towels...I laid the bag flat, and put a few layers of paper towels on top, and told him it was OK. Then I rolled it up, and threw it into a trash can when we came to a town. (This plastic bag idea would work for car sickness too.)
  • My son uses them to put on his shoes when he weed-eats. He just slits the bag open and ties it over his shoes and he doesn't get grass clippings all over his shoes and socks.
  • This tip is green and also good for charity. I donate my extra plastic bags to a literacy center which sells cheap, used books, as well as to a local thrift shop which serves the poor in our community. The thrift shop especially appreciates the small, longer ones our . Those big, clear dry-cleaning bags are also always welcome at the shop.
  • I have a bag in my bathroom where I put old lost socks, wash cloths, etc. for spot cleaning.
  • I have an extra one over the door hook that holds my daughters tub toys.


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